November 06 - 08, 2017
Atlanta, Georgia

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 2016

DAY 3 — THE HOME STRETCH

The 2016 JOC Inland Distribution Conference will cap off three days of critical content with a mix of TED-style speakers and analysis of the technology intended to smooth the flow of cargo while taking some of the stress out of the the day-to-day life of a logistics professional.

 

 

 

7:00 AM — 1:00 PM

 

REGISTRATION

Location: Grand Ballroom Foyer

 

 
SPONSORED BY

sponsor

 


 

7:30 — 8:30 AM

 

NETWORKING BREAKFAST

Location: Networking Area

 

 
 

 


 

8:30 — 8:45 AM

 

 

WELCOMING REMARKS

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

 

 

William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

 

 


 

8:45 — 9:30AM

 

 

 

FEATURED SPEAKER: 
A TED-STYLE TALK ON 3D PRINTING AND SUPPLY CHAINS

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

If you think 3D printing is all about boutique manufacturing, think again. 3D printing, or additive manufacturing, is about supply chains and increasingly about high-volume industrial manufacturing. Manufacturers are using 3D printers to build not just prototypes or parts but also supply chains that can more rapidly respond to dynamic, real-time customer demands, reduce inventory and slice into transportation costs while dramatically compressing the time needed to ship products. Enterprise software giant SAP and UPS, the largest U.S. transportation company, have teamed to integrate 3D printing into supply chain processes and build a foundation for on-demand manufacturing. In this TED-style talk, Steven Kim of SAP will show how 3D printing won't just change manufacturing but also challenge shippers and transportation providers as on-demand manufacturing blends with on-demand shipping.

 

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— SPEAKER —

Steven Kim
Senior Director
LoB Digital Assets & IoT, SAP

 

David Roegge
Director of Marketing,
High Tech,
UPS

 


 

9:30 — 10:30 AM

 

 

 

THE AMAZON EFFECT: 
HOW E-COMMERCE IS TRANSFORMING FREIGHT TRANSPORTATION

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

E-commerce, and Amazon.com in particular, is rapidly changing logistics as we know it. Powered by the astounding growth of subscription-based Amazon Prime, Amazon has moved openly and aggressively to increase its reach, capabilities and capacity in the logistics and distribution arena. The “Amazon Effect” is rippling across supply chains and changing the nature of e-commerce in ways that have all types of shippers, carriers, logistics providers, and warehouse operators straining to keep up. To stay in the market, everyone is working hard on ways to build more “customer-centric” supply chains that enable quicker distribution and last-mile delivery and meet precise fulfillment requirements demanded by consumers. That’s driving e-commerce to a new level of complexity which in turn requires a different type of industrial and distribution footprint and a greater level of automation and sophisticated technology. Eventually, that could include autonomous tractor-trailers and 3D printing. Many trends in transportation and technology are being driven toward a convergence point by consumer demand and the shift to online shopping, and supply chain capacity, whether measured in terms of truck drivers or warehouse space, supply chain visibility and supply chain performance will reach new levels of importance. This session will look at the broad impact e-commerce, Amazon and its competitors and automation are having on the logistics business and how we must respond to its challenge.

 

 
SPONSORED BY
sponsor 
— INTRODUCED BY —

Jim Vrtis
Chief Technology Officer,
Truckstop.com

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —

Griffith V. Lynch
Chief Operating Officer,
Georgia Ports Authority

 

Wally Lynch
CEO,
Zipline Logistics

 

Jeff Brady
Director of Transportation and Logistics,
Harry & David

 

Chuck Moyer
Chief Commercial Officer,
LSO Logistics,
and First Vice President,
Customized Logistics and
Delivery Association

 

J.P. Wiggins
Co-Founder and Vice President, Logistics,
3Gtms

 

 


 

10:30 — 11:00 AM

 

NETWORKING BREAK

Location: Networking Area

 

   

 


 

11:00 AM — 11:45 PM

 

 

 

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A U.S. TRUCKER

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

The plight of the truck driver has seldom been as troubling as it is today. Hours-of-service regulations have changed multiple times over the past several years, putting new pressures on drivers. Delays on both ends of their delivery cycle, often the result of shipper lapses, only increase the pressure and, ironically, have put drivers in the crosshairs of some shippers who want their product delivered regardless of the circumstances — leading to new regulations barring driver coercion. 2017, meanwhile, will bring new rules requiring all trucks to be equipped with electronic logging devices, adding a new dimension to driver concerns.

Trucking companies claim there is a shortage of qualified drivers, and they do have trouble recruiting and keeping them. In the truckload sector, driver turnover rates have approached, and sometimes exceeded, 100 percent in recent years. Allie Knight, a driver for Montana-based Jim Palmer Trucking, is the kind of truck driver carriers say represents the future of trucking. She’s a millennial and she’s tech-savvy, documenting her experiences through an online blog and her own YouTube video channel, through which she shares a positive view of trucking and her own experiences on the road. In this Q&A, Knight will inform carriers and shippers why their businesses are at risk if they don’t deliver real solutions to the drivers who move their goods.

 

 

 

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

Mark Willis
On-air Host/Anchor of Road Dog Trucking News, Siriusxm Satellite Radio

 
— FEATURED SPEAKER —

Allie Knight
Driver,
Jim Palmer Trucking

 

 


 

11:45 AM — 12:45 PM

 

 

 

CURE-ALL OR KRYPTONITE: 
IS THE NEW BREED OF FREIGHT DISRUPTORS SUSTAINABLE?

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

In the Age of Uber, a wave of technology companies is targeting freight transportation as the next big market to be transformed by smartphones, mobile apps and Web-based collaborative networking. Although claims that internet-based technology will overturn current freight transportation models and eliminate the need for 3PLs, freight brokers and transportation management systems are likely overstated, internet-based services for shippers, brokers and truckers will certainly help smaller players compete and get and stay in the game. For shippers and brokers, especially small and mid-sized companies, effective use of web-based technology can unlock capacity that otherwise would be difficult to find.

For smaller trucking operators, the right technology can put more freight in their tractor-trailers and straight trucks. Technology companies and venture capital firms are pursuing it with hard cash amounting to hundreds of millions of dollars, in the process trying to emulate the success of enterprises such as Uber and AirBNB. But there are obstacles that make the complete “Uberization” of freight transportation unlikely. For one, the freight transportation business isn’t the taxi business. Most truck freight moves under contract.

Shippers that sign contracts with carriers move large volumes, and need to do so with consistency. Scale reduces cost. Those shippers also develop carrier relationships that go far beyond the transactional level. They engage in collaborative networking to an extent that can “embed” their core trucking firms in their enterprises. And, most importantly, in many cases the venture capitalists storming the industry, while progressive in terms of technology, have little logistics experience. This session will delve into the so-called disruptors who are trying to transform the transportation business while analyzing whether they’ll actually do that or never live up to the billing.

 
— SESSION CHAIR —

William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

 

— PANELISTS —

Richard Metzler
Chief Marketing Officer,
uShip.com

 

Lance Healy
Co-Founder and Chief Innovation Officer,
Banyan Technology

 

Tommy Barnes
President,
project44

 

Barry Conlon
CEO, Founder,
Overhaul

 


 

12:45 PM

 

 

 

CLOSING REMARKS

LOCATION: General Session (Ballroom A & B)

 

 

William B. Cassidy
Senior Editor, Trucking,
JOC, IHS Maritime & Trade

 

 


 

1:15 — 5:15 PM

 

 

 

SHIPPER ROUNDTABLE

LOCATION: The Barclay Room

This roundtable is for a small group of beneficial cargo owners. The aim is to provide a forum for discussion of issues that you and other shippers are likely to see in the coming months and what lessons can be drawn from the experience of last year. The discussion will be led by one of our JOC editors in a confidential, off-the-record environment. This will be a senior-level discussion in which you will have the opportunity to share experiences and hear the views of your peers on key transportation and logistics challenges as the year progresses.

You must be a BCO/Shipper (you must own the goods that are being shipped) in order to take part in this event.

Please click here to register for this event.

 
SPONSORED BY

sponsor

 

sponsor

 

sponsor

 

sponsor

 


 

6:00 PM

 

 

65TH ANNUAL PORT OF NEW ORLEANS NIGHT

LOCATION: Peabody Hotel

65th Annual Port of New Orleans Night: Come join the Memphis World Trade Club for the 65th Annual Port of New Orleans Night! Separate registration is required. Watch this space for details.